How to Properly Choose an Oak Lawn Chiropractor

 

Botti Chiropractic & Wellness

5569 W. 95TH Street, Oak Lawn IL 60453 / 2674 N. Halsted Ave., Chicago IL 60614

 

If you have any experience with chiropractic or you know somebody that has, you will often hear them tell you that “you need to find the right chiropractor” or a “good chiropractor”.  Most often this is done through word of mouth.  “You should go see my oak lawn chiropractor Dr. Botti…he’s really helped me!”  While referrals are good a start one must consider why he or she is making an appointment with a chiropractor before he or she sets out to choose the appropriate one.  If for example a person feels as though they need a tune up or has an inclination that they may need to be adjusted well then that person will pretty much have success anywhere they go.  There is the exception that we do see often in our Oak Lawn office where a patient believes this is what they need, only to find out through examination that this not what they need.

Many times long standing although minor aches and pains which come and go are the result of underlying biomechanical and neurological compromise which needs to be treated in a logical order.  This order needs to exist as to 1) Not harm the patient…and 2) Improve the patient’s condition successfully.  In our practice for example, we put so much emphasis on proper diagnosis from the get go that we often do not adjust our patients until we have intervened on higher levels of priority.  As a chiropractic physician, we often need to confirm our suspected diagnosis by having the patient introduce a single specific exercise between their first and second visit as a test to determine whether we are right in our suspected diagnosis, and can proceed with a recommend course of treatment, or if we need to take a look at our differential diagnosis and further explore another angle.  Patients are often confused or frustrated when I tell them that I want them to perform a single exercise after their first visit and that we will further assess their response on their next visit.  However, when the patient returns feeling substantially better and I have not even physically treated the patient  it can be very rewarding in that it creates patient trust, and allows me to proceed with treatment in confidence.  You will quickly be labeled a “bad chiropractor” if you assume you know what is best for a patient without actually confirming it first – something that happens all too often unfortunately.

For example, a patient presents to the office complaining of neck pain.  Patient X, a 32 year old female, has a three year history of intermittent/frequent neck pain  ranging VAS 2/10 to 7/10 at its worst, however as the patient sits before us the pain has been a steady 3/10 for the last month.  Although Patient X didn’t mention this on her intake forms we find out from further questioning that the patient has a history of right sided migraine headaches and occasional right sided jaw pain.  Pt. attributes sinus issues to the migraines and was given a mouth guard by her dentist which gives her some relief, although the pain does not go away entirely.  Patient X states that she used to be able to “crack her own neck”  but now she can not.  The patient has been seeing another chiropractor for the past two years who would put her on stim and heat and adjust her monthly.  She also states that the chiropractor took xrays and actually showed her that the curve in her neck was “reversed”.  Before finishing the exam the Patient X states that she knows she’ll be better once she gets adjusted since this has given her relief in the past.

One type of chiropractor may be thinking to himself at this point, “fantastic-this patient already knows that I have what she needs…what should I have for lunch”.  A Chiropractic Physician, on the other hand, never assumes.  A Chiropractic Physician listens to the findings of his orthopedic or neurological examination.   A Chiropractic Physician correlates his objective data with the relevant subjective data from his patient.  A Chiropractic Physician confirms his diagnosis without harming the patient.  A Chiropractic Physician treats the causative factor of a patient’s pain with the appropriate and most evidence based methods.

In the above mentioned case, we were able to diagnosis without MRI,  that the patient was dealing with chronic disc herniation’s at multiple levels throughout the cervical spine.  Despite the patient insisting that we adjust her, we instead introduced some simple specific functional movements for the patient to perform over the next several days while asking her to also avoid doing a few things that she was probably doing without knowing the harm it was causing.  When the patient returned for her second visit she informed us that she was feeling significant improvement in her symptoms and had not woken up with migraine since speaking to us.  Patient X has since asked us to address several other issues that she forgot to mention on her intake forms and has referred several of her family members in with similar issues.

In summary, when choosing an Oak Lawn Chiropractor that’s best for you, choose one that does not emphasis methods of treatment or new cutting technology in their office.  Chose one who appears to spend time with their patients.  Choose one who appears to show an emphasis on diagnosis and objectivity.  And choose one that appears that is cautiously optimistic when delivering their treatment recommendations to you vs. overtly confident – as confidence comes discipline, confirmation and patience!

For more information on Patient X’s condition or symptoms that you may share with Patient X please see some of the links below.

 

This article was first published on:

BOTTI CHIROPRACTIC & WELLNESS

5569 W. 95TH STREET, OAK LAWN IL 60453 / 2674 N. HALSTED, CHICAGO IL 60614

www.bottichiropractic.com

 

  1. http://practicalneurology.com/2010/12/evaluation-of-cervicalgia-with-headache/
  2. https://www.practicalpainmanagement.com/pain/spine/discogenic/cervical-disc-disease-referred-pain-tmj
  3. https://www.spine-health.com/conditions/herniated-disc/cervical-herniated-disc-symptoms-and-treatment-options
  4. https://www.health.harvard.edu/blog/chronic-pain-the-invisible-disability-2017042811360
  5. http://www.chiropracticspinalanalysisnetwork.com